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of this stuff. it's out in the open. it's up on the websites of u.n., european union, the american bar association, the deans of most law schools in american universities, leading american foundations. it's all there on the internet. people are not talking about world government anybody, but world governance, a form of transnational governance. look at four people, quick views, and talbot, the president of the brookings institution, a major think tank in washington. the former secretary of state, and as a journalist for time magazine in the 1990s, they wrote an article in which he welcomed super national political authority. he said, quote, "i'll bet within the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete and all states will recognize a single global authority." he concluded saying "the devra davis luges of power upwards of units of administration is basically a positive phenomena." coe, currently, today, the chief legal adviser of the u.s. state department, in other words, he advises the president on what the law is, was gave a major speech last week at georgetown law,
's right out in the open. up on the web sites of u.n., european union, the american bar association, the deans of most law schools at american universities, leading american foundations, it's all there on the internet. and people are not talking about world government anymore, they're talking about global gore nance -- governance, this form of transnational governance. so let's look at four people, quick views of theirs, who have given ideas about this. strobe talbot is currently the president of the brookings institution, he's former secretary of state and as a journalist for time magazine in the 1990s, talbot wrote an article in which he welcomed supernational political authority. he said, quote: i'll bet that within the next hundred years nationhood as we know it will be obsolete, and all state will recognize a single global authority. he concluded by saying that this devolution of power upwards toward the supernational and downwards toward autonomous units of administration is basically a positive phenomena. harold coe is currently -- today he's the chief legal adviser of the u.
dictator kim jong-un, who took office in december after his father died, kim jong-un understands the threat that information poses to his rule. one of his first acts after succeeding his father was to issue a shoot-to-kill order to guards along the korean border. anyone observed fleeing across the 210 river or the yellow river to china was to be stopped, he demanded. there are also reports he is trying to stop the information flow into north korea by forcibly relocating the families of the north koreans to have escaped. the report say that he is moving some of them to the interior of the country where they're will be out of reach of the chinese carriers or -- and the chinese of phones operate. let me close with a "from a north korean boy who escaped to china when he was 13 years old, and i refer, of course, to joseph. ' joseph and tell his story in my book. a couple of years ago when i was beginning to do there research on the book, i heard him give a moving address to liberty in north korea. the organization that adrian founded and which helped by joseph escaped from china. joseph told the
declaration of human rights after world war ii. thanks in part two of eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the u.n. declaration after her husband's death. today, more than 70 countries recognize a right to health or health care in their constitutions. virtually every industrialized nation can take a step to implement these rights via establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens. with one major exception. anybody know? the united states of america. but it's not for lack of trying. after fdr's death, president harry truman announced a national health insurance program that would've made medical coverage for all part of the social security act. but the physicians of the american medical association attacked truman's plan as socialized medicine. that might also sound familiar. and in the early cold war, the ama won that battle, and treatments proposal was defeated. other presidents including richard nixon and bill clinton tried the passing of universal health care programs, but they fail due to entrenched and vigorous opposition from not just the medical profession, but also
in the hands of the green lobby. >> well, the u.n. has been very encouraging of the green lobby and the screen job issue is not an issue here in the united state. it is an issue also in europe being encouraged by the u.n., encouraged by the meeting over the summer. but europe is also finding green job aren't all they thought they would be. spain has stopped subsidies for solar power under that doesn't work in sunny spain it's not going to work anywhere. germany has also stopped at subsidies which is more understandable because there's a lot of clubs in germany, even though the economy isn't cloudy at all. the u.n. has had a strong influence on this. >> yes, sir. >> chuck bradford. you are probably not old enough to remember, the jimmy carter gave lots of money, billions of dollars to alternate energy projects. >> i do remember. >> too many of those plants still exist is the question? i don't think they lasted more than a couple years. secondly, are you familiar with another jimmy carter program, where he gave money to five different steel mills, for about engraft immediately on the fifth one p
or the denial of health care would be something new to our system. something extremely un-american. but i believe that the claim that the u.s. does not currently ration health care has been counter productive, damaging, and inaccurate. and my book uses historical evidence to show that the u.s. has rationed health care and has done for so for a long time. way europeans through canadians there do through waiting room and caps on national expendture. the country allocated and denied health care in a complex and unique way called the american way of rationing. so what is the american way of rationing? and how can history help us understand it? in classical economics, rationing simply means the good and services are distributed by price. in order not everybody can afford everything they could possibly want or need. so supply and demand are controlled by people's ability to pay. rationing by price or rationing by the market certainly goes a long way to describe the u.s. health care delivery system. the government may not officially deny you health care. many americans cannot get the care they n
an issue in the united states. it is an issue also in europe, being encouraged by the un and the meetings in rio over the summer but europe is also finding that green jobs are not all they thought they would be. spain just opted subsidies for solar power and if solar power doesn't work in sunny spain it won't work anywhere. germany has also stopped it subsidies for solar power which is more understandable because there are a lot of clouds in germany. even though the economy isn't cloudy at all. the un has had a strong influence on this. >> chuck bradford. you are cannot hold enough to remember but jimmy carter gave lots of money, billions of dollars to alternate energy projects. >> i do remember. i had to waiting gas lines in the 1970s. >> to any of those plants still exist? i don't think they lasted more than a couple years. secondly are you familiar with another jimmy carter program when he gave money to build five different steel mills four of which went bankrupt almost immediately and the fifth one put out of business the plant in kansas city they blame on things? >> jimmy carter's pr
understandable. there are more clouds. the un has had a strong influence. >> you're probably not old enough to remember but jimmy carter gave billions of dollars to alternate energy products. >> i was waiting in the gas lines. >> to those plans still exist but settled think there lasted. are you familiar with another jimmy carter program he gave money to build five steel mills for went bankrupt almost immediately and the fifth one point* of business from of plant in kansas city. >> to make carter's programs did not work then. i remember reading one or two hours to fill up with gasoline in the dc area. these programs are not working now and are unlikely to work in the future. the government cannot at pick the winning project. and never would have thought to pick the apple iphone 5 people wait in line because the one to buy one. [laughter] not necessarily technology that it is an expensive but what they're willing to spend money. we don't know what it it is. i am sure there are many entrepreneurs who have a better idea than those in washington. >> would you be in favor of a significantly hig
armbands, still mourning james dean. u.n. maureen sneaking cigarettes, hiking dusty piles of moody magazines under the bed. >> living in the coldwell ordered house of adult experience. >> a decade lost between us, my student years in chicago, london for nearly as long, returning to this country and 73, a year in the ozarks vi -- before he hitchhiked west. communal flats, antiwar marches, street theater collect its in arkansas, northern california. and narrative full of the usual drugs in fanciful while you are at home, a respectable cambridge wife, reading homer in the original as your toddler snapped. >> when i had young children, i found consolation, the language in the unholy joy it gives. a fluttering -- >> still free and childless, i did not know your suffering, your beautiful firstborn son. only later did we learn this word autistic. when i gave birth you sent us picture books of mother goose and said yes it's jonah who will will be 23 in the year 2000. who could imagine such a year? and i don't want to squabble about what killed you that very year, whether you're smoking or
unattractive, it's un-american. in this country more than any other, you get to choose the song of your nation and the song of your life. get your song back. put it in your heart as it is in mine, and get your mojo working again. you cannot prepare for defeat and expect to live in victory. shake it off and step up. through adversity comes great opportunity. the information age that saw this nation lead the world in a way so remarkable, was led by giants such as general electric, hewlett-packard, ibm, and microsoft, all of which originated in past times. they didn't just hunkered down. they didn't just hang on. they didn't just survive. they went out there and they conquered that storm, and that's what you have to do. anything is possible if you believe and if you have faith. they cannot uproot you. they cannot break you. they cannot topple you. believe your called. believe your chosen. believe you are equipped. believe he can. because you can. you've done it before and you will do it again. listen to this creed. do not choose to be a common man. it is your right to be uncommon. if you conceive
the government, the u.n., how do you weigh yen? also the second question do feel al qaeda is more or less defeated after killing of some of bin laden? >> with drones there is a significance day significant advance of humanitarian warfare. the three principals are necessity, determination and proportionality. is a city meeting are the people you are fighting is there some way to deal with those on the bin laden and and al-zawahiri other than capturing them? i come down on the side of no. making sure you target the right people and the striking targets with the level of course, the diss required and no more. they give the ability to make sure you hit the right target. at the don't make mistakes that there is a better chance to reach the 100% goal with the drone they add a show are dropping bob and proportionality. you can try one of the options was to bomb the compound to smithereens killing every man the, will become a child, bench again again, child and go outbid a 500-mile radius and levies smoking coal and the president's credit dismiss that immediately. trying to target one individual
government and the a ring government that had the u.n. security council, not security comes, general assembly, in 1998, at which their rings agree to withdraw the threats. and after that there was a parody, a couple years when the british tried to make sure they were telling the truth and had been telling the truth the but before that there was kind of a step-by-step thing. i mean, i was pushing very hard to be allowed to just do ordinary professional things that writers do, such as -- i came out to be able to talk about, talk to my readers and things like that. all of this was a battle with security forces, internationally. and gradually we got a little more cooperation, and so that got done a little bit. i mean, the thing that really, have to say this, the thing that really make a big difference to in those years was this country. because america allowed me to come here for periods of time, which started off being short, like a week or 10 days, and ended up being much longer, like too much, too and as months at a time, and litter and ordinary free life. [applause] so i was allowed to make m
about obama's speech before the u.n.. there's a lot of things you don't know. i cited the caliber of the liberals on fox news. they had a former vice presidential candidate on the democratic party. they have bob -- or bob, a blow hazard, but he ran mondale's campaign. susan ran decaucus' campaign. they are liberals, but they are as smart as they come. [laughter] they're the -- [applause] they're -- [laughter] it's the best liberalism they have to offer. [laughter] meanwhile, on msnbc, they have people i've never heard of, and they are functional retards representing the conservative arguments, and then i said in the prime time lineup, there's only one partisan host, sean hannity. they cite bill o'riley, middle of the road, believes in global warming, gun control, and loves the obama, and kopple got testing saying he's not opinionated? no, he's opinionated, it's that he's the best journalist in america. [laughter] he would agree with me on all of that. [laughter] okay, so then it runs, and they have a horrible clip of o'reilly screaming at a guest, the famous barnny frank one or so
prime minister in february of 2005, in a damning un report that was leaked that held syria responsible. he survived all that and actually emerged in somewhat flying colors by 2008-2009, accepted back into the regional order, into the international community, even representatives at an anational plows meeting to jump start the arab-israeli peace talk. so i think he developed a sense of survivalism. he and his supporters. to the point where, when you have another challenge, and the most serious to date, obviously, since march 2011 and continuing today, that sense of triumphantism, that they're on the right side of history, sense of destiny, and i sincerely believe if i talked to him today he would believe that he is not only surviving and protecting the sect and those that supported him in power, but he is saving the country. his match 30th, 2011 speech, his first speech that mapped out what his response to the uprising -- he blamed, he still does, terrorists, storm enemies and armed gangs, and many people in the west thought that was a total misdirection, intentional misdirection from t
they love you but you also in new york teachers valued un respected you. >> i know you all think you are pretty smart but there's no better judge of the authenticity of a human being than the kids in those schools. they smell a rat. i will tell you all of you have questions, time to start lining up. i will throw one more topic out in advance and i remind those of you with questions that we're seven days from an election if nobody's going to ask about the political vacations' of this what you're going to leave it to me to do that. i want to say something about these nonacademic programs. you mentioned nation at risk study in 1983. that is what i was in high school. they pronounced my generation the dumbest group of people the american public education system ever produced and predicted we would lead the american economy into the third world. what actually happened when we get the workforce that work force was the biggest productivity boom in american economic history. i know the liabilities of claiming credit for inventing the internet but we pretty much did. the standardized tests th
southern support, republicans repeatedly condemned the south as aggressive, undemocratic, even un-american. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, southern sectional radicals known as fire eaters, those people who preached the gospel of this union, they took to the public platform and to the newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had to act immediately to protect itself from the hatred of evil republicans, cries of secession filled the southern air. now, this was not the first time sectional crisis had gripped the country, however. there have been several sharp sectional disputes prior to 1860. each of these, each of the major ones had been settled by a compromise. here i will point specifically to the four critical ones. first, the constitutional convention of 1787 in philadelphia. the missouri crisis of 1820, had to do with the admission of missouri as a slave state, the future slavery in the louisiana purchase which, of course, as you know was much more than a state of louisiana. it covered almost all the territory from th
-- repeatedly condemned the south as unprogressive, undemocratic and even un-american. with this party on the threshold, southern sectional radicals, those people who preach the gospel of this union, they took to the public platform in the newspaper columns to proclaim the crisis of the south was that hands. the south had to act immediately to protect itself from the hatred of evil republicans, cries of succession filled the southern air. now this was not the first time the crisis that gripped the country however. there have been several disputes prior to 1860. each of these, each of the major ones have been settled by a compromise. i will point specifically to the four critical ones. first, the constitutional convention of 1787 in philadelphia, the misery crisis of 1820, which had to do with the admission of missouri as a slave state, slavery and the unit -- which was more than the state of louisiana that covered almost all the territory from the mississippi river to the rocky mountains saved for texas. it was settled by the missouri compromise and then in 1832 and 33 then the nala va
-scientific elites are conservatives. in particular global warming and evolution. todd akin made some rather un- invite and comments about pregnancy and for days this was a front page story about how he doesn't understand biology. however, when someone on the far left is some income on president barack obama says vaccines might cause autism, that was ignored. and yes he did say that. we'll talk about that later in the top. some also, there's only been several books published on the topic. if you want to find out how the righties batted science is a big market for that. to our knowledge this is the first book on the anti-scientific left. so progressive and anti-science as well. >> let's give the devil his due -- within months of yours. >> regresses or anti-science is not reported by the media. the media simply looks the other way when political allies do things that are anti-science. so who are the presses? we took david mellons chartier and kind of was able to to fit more of our political ideology today because libertarians are probably the easiest to identify. conservatives are the mainstream
and even suicideion, during the winter months. mont.un goes away on the firstci of october, and it might come out by the first of theby theirt following july. the last of the thing was, gran was in a drinking culture. army officers in those days were expected to drink like gentlemen, which meant that they were expected to drink a lot an ant's vo the effects. grant's boys would start toe slur. so would start to wobble when he had to drink. he was a sorryrr excuse for an officer in the sculpture. he resigned rather than be brought up on charges of dereliction for his drinking. reputation thation that grant acquired in the army. the army between the war withar mexico and the civil war was axd very small and very gossipy club. okay, so grant drinking stoutcla out of the army. no one thought anything of it began,when the civil war grant vaulted over dozens of officers, senior to himself. those who took the light in spreading the stories of grant's drinking. of i tracked down an account ofi tk grant's drinking to the extent that i could. exten then it discovered that on maybe two occasions dur
in the u.n., when you look at their position on iran, when you look at their position on other issues, they as often as not tide against the west rather than with the west, and that is a simpler by moving to a world in which there will be great diversity. as to how countries fashioned their own versions of maternity and allowing themselves to politically. -- align themselves geopolitically. let me begin to him by offering some thoughts on what we do about this. moving to a world in which we are globalized and interdependent, but in which there's no single, single captain at the helm, is a world that provides great opportunities but also great risk. we have never lived in a world in which decisions made in beijing immediately impact decisions made in brussels which immediate impact decisions here which immediately impact decisions in brasilia. we need to figure out how to manage that world, how to provide global governance in a world that is not only multipolar in the sense of multiple poles of power, but also quite ideologically diverse. and i will and simply with offering free though
the extension of that. he also wishes he could've focused on preventing civilian casualties. a u.n. report talked about this is the fifth year in a row where civilian casualties have risen. while some are decreasing, insurgency caused them on the rise. so how does that translate into how the campaign is working? would you like to make any remarks at all? i like to open it up. and see if vernon loeb has approximate for questions. >> do we have any questions? >> i guess we should use the microphone. please, go ahead. >> in your book, it was mentioned that betray petraeus wanted to become joint chairmen. is there a reason why he couldn't be joint chiefs of staff chairman? >> that is a great question. part of it has that washington is only big enough for one star, and david petraeus is not it. the thought is that he would not be malleable as a chairman and was a tough budget cut, equipping and thinking about how we are going to fight the next war, on the horizon, i think the thought was having that position would -- he would serve as sort of a white house objective there. on the other hand, as
declaration of human rights after world war ii. thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the un's declaration after her husband's death. today, more than 70 countries recognize a right to health or health care in their constitutions. virtually every industrialized nation has taken a step to influence these rights by establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens. with one major exception. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on her facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2.
southern support. republicans repeatedly convinced progressives democratics, even un-american, with his party on the threshold of the president tea, some articles are those people who preach the gospel to the public by foreign with the newspaper columns to proclaim the crisis of the south. the south had to act immediately to protect itself from the hated evil republicans with a succession that filled the southern air. this was not the first time the sectional crisis that gripped the country however. i've done several sharp disputes prior to 1860. each of these -- each of the major ones have been settled to compromise. here i will point specifically to the four political ones. first come the constitutional division in philadelphia, the missouri crisis of 1820 the admission of of missouri as a slave state in the future of slavery in the wiki and a purpose for which of course is you notice as much whether the state of louisiana, covered almost all the territory from the mississippi river to the rocky mountains. it was settled by the missouri compromise. 1832 and 33, nullification between t
in government, u.n. poll sicks domestically. how do you weigh in on the ethics of using drone, and then second question, after the killing of bin laden, do you feel al-qaeda is more or less defeated? >> okay. good questions, both. on the subject of drones, i think they are the most significant advance in humanitarian warfare in history. i think that because the three principles of a just war are necessity, determination, and proportionality. necessity meaning are the people you are fighting, do you need to fight them? is there a way to deal with bin laden and other than shooting at them or capturing them? i come down strongly on the side of, no, these are irreconcilable. the next two questions are making sure that you're targeting the right people and that you're striking targets with the level of force required and no more; right? now, think about it, drones give you more than any tool in history the ability to make sure you are hitting the right target. doesn't mean they don't make mistakes, but you have a better chance of reaching that 100% goal with a drone than you do firing a shell or dr
. undemocratic, even un-american. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, southern sectional radicals -- those people who preach the gospel of the union. they took to the public platform and the newspaper colins -- column to proclaim the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had to act immediately to protect itself from the evil republicans who cried the succession -- [inaudible] and this was not the first time sectional crisis had gripped the country. there have been several sharp sectional disputes prior to 1860. each of these -- each of the major ones had been settled by a comprise. herely point to the specifically to the four critical ones. first, the constitutional convention of 1778. the missouri crisis of 1820, which had to did do the admission of missouri as a slave state and the louisiana purchase which was more than the state of louisiana be covered all the territory from the mississippi river to the rockies mountains. it was settled be i the missouri comprise. then in 1832 and '33 the nullification controversy between the state of south carolina and the graft was -- fe
probably know in 1961 was one of the people called before the house un-american activities committee. during the whole washing down the stairs operation. >> right. well, i spoke with doug wachter about this, by the way. according to the former fbi agent bernie, they fbi had a wire topped on them. this wiretap take up a conversation between doug wachter and richard aoki. dug in richard were fellow students at berkeley in the mid-and late '50s. subsequent to that, the fbi approached richard aoki and asked them if you become an fbi informant. and the documents that were released from richard aoki's informant file are consistent with that. they contain references to richard aoki associate with certain people during the late '50s, and they show that he was approached at least by 1961, and that these documents, which the fbi tried very hard to cover up and which were released only as a result of a court order, turn out to have bernie's initials in the bottom of them. so they are consistent with what bernie told me. in essential ways. and what these documents show is that starting in 1961,
repeatedly condemned the south undemocratic, even un-american. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, seven radicals, those people who preach the gospel of the engine. they took to the public platform into the newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had to act immediately to protect his golf from the hatred of evil republican, prize of succession with southern air. this is not the first time crisis encrypt the country however. there have been several sharp dispute in 1860. each of the use -- each of the major ones have been settled by a compromise. here i report specifically to the four critical ones. first come the constitutional convention 787. the missouri crisis of 1820 have to do with the slave states in the future of slavery and always the purpose, which of course as you know was much more than the state of louisiana and covered almost all the territory from the mystic river to the rocky mountains for texas. it was settled by the missouri compromise. in 1832 and 33 for nullification controversy between the state of sou
institutions like the un and world bank that they were all designed to be weak, they were all designed to play a secondary role to nations whose sovereignty we saw as inviolable. i don't think that is sustainable because so many of the interests you or i have as individual citizens of wherever we come from are really affected by decisions that happen on a global stage. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. numbers are on the screen if you'd like to participate in this author:2 your 2-585-3885. in east and central time zones 585-3886. if you live in the mountain and pacific time zones, mr. rothkopf, former managing director of kissinger associates and current ceo of foreign policy. what is foreign policy? >> guest: divisional, washington post foreign policy magazine, the foreign policy website which is not much bigger than the magazine, three million visitors on the web site and runs a series of events and other programs on international issues. >> host: mr. rothkopf, in "power, inc." you have a chapter about a swedish boat. what is that story? >> guest: i wanted to go to the origin story of th
this is un-american, it looks like we are slaughtering these people. and we need to call an end to the war. and bush believing that the situation is total chaos for the iraqis and that saddam hussein's forces have been totally routed calls an end to the war after 100 hours. the situation certainly was badly misread because in fact all of the american forces believed that the republican guard had all been caught and were being torn apart on this highway of death. as it turned out the vast majority of them had gotten away. i think all of the forces in the pentagon and the white house and probably the state department believed that saddam hussein had been so fatally weakened in 1991 that he could never survive. as it turned out in fact that the essential forces of the republican guard and of his command and control structure had survived and as we saw with the slaughter of the shi'ites very shortly thereafter he was able to maintain his repressive regime. the question you directly asked me, should we have gone into baghdad? that would have been hard to do. that wasn't what the coalition had b
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)